Nov 09, 2018

Study New ECDC Study: last-line antibiotics increasingly ineffective

It is a figure that is significantly higher than previously thought: Around 33,000 Europeans die every year as a result of bacterial infections. The main reason is that antibiotics are no longer effective against many of these infections. Even last-line antibiotics are no longer able to cure almost 40 percent of all infections investigated in a recent study.

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Aug 01, 2018

Study Antibiotic stewardship plus hand hygiene - more effective against resistant germs than traditional strategy

The global spread of multi-resistant bacteria, particularly gram-negative bacteria, is a risk for patients. When this type of germ is detected in a hospital, the traditional strategy of “screening, isolation and eradication” usually takes effect. But does evidence prove that this method really is the most effective? A team of researchers asked themselves this question and came to astonishing conclusions.

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May 06, 2018

News 5th May: WHO World Hand Hygiene Day

Every year more than 30 million patients worldwide suffer from healthcare-associated sepsis. To prevent avoidable infections and improve patients’ safety, every year on the 5th of May, the World Health Organization calls upon healthcare facilities to sign up for its campaign SAVE LIVES: Clean Your Hands. This campaign encourages healthcare professionals to take concrete actions and use hand hygiene best practices. Three useful facts.

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Apr 04, 2018

Study Consistent hand hygiene saves lives

Consistent hand hygiene reduces the monthly mortality rate in nursing homes, particularly during influenza peaks. The use of antibiotics also declines. These are the findings in a study published in the American Journal of Infection Control.

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